2020 REGENERON STS FINALIST

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North Shore’s Kyra McCreery Named a Finalist in Regeneron Science Talent Search 2020

On January 22nd, the North Shore School District proudly announced that Kyra McCreery, a North Shore High School senior, was named a finalist in the Regeneron Science Talent Search (STS) 2020,  the nation’s oldest and most prestigious science and mathematics competition. The 2020 finalists were selected from 1,993 highly qualified entrants, all of whom completed an original research project and extensive application process. The finalists were selected based on their projects’ scientific rigor and their potential to become world-changing scientists and leaders. Kyra was one of only four finalists selected on Long Island, an extraordinary accomplishment! The finalists are each awarded at least $25,000, and the top 10 awards range from $40,000 to $250,000. The top 10 Regeneron Science Talent Search 2020 winners will be announced at a black-tie gala awards ceremony at the National Building Museum on March 10, 2020. The top prize for the most promising emerging STEM leader in the United States is $250,000

Kyra’s science research entitled, “Associations between the Slowdown in North Atlantic Tropical-Cyclone Translation Speed and Intensifying Storm Precipitation,” focuses on how hurricanes are slowing down, resulting in increased precipitation in a given area.

Nearly 2,000 students entered the competition this year. Since 1942, first in partnership with Westinghouse, then with Intel 1998-2016, and now with Regeneron, the Society has provided a national stage for the country's best and brightest young scientists to present original research to nationally recognized professional scientists.

Earlier this month, Regeneron STS named 300 top scholars as semifinalists.  Both Kyra McCreery and Keaton Danseglio, from North Shore High School, earned this distinction. Keaton’s science research entitled, “Transgenerational Effects of Paternal Stress in Drosophila melanogaster,” focuses on how a parental stress may affect the fitness of its offspring.



Keaton’s science research titled, “Transgenerational Effects of Paternal Stress in Drosophila melanogaster,” focuses on how a parental stress may affect the fitness of its offspring.  

Congratulations to Kyra McCreery and Keaton Danseglio for these remarkable accomplishments. In addition, many thanks to their science research teacher, Dr. Molly Mordechai, and the North Shore Science department, led by Mr. Steven Menchel. Best of luck to Kyra moving forward in the Regeneron Science Talent Search competition!

Article and photos by Shelly Newman

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